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diasporicroots:

John Henrik Clarke - A Great and Mighty Walk (full version)

Documentarian St. Claire Bourne takes a close-up look at author and historian John Henrik Clarke, who, on camera for much of the film, bounces back and forth between a description of his own personal history, and his views on the history of Africa and of Pan-Africanism. His points are backed up by old newsreel footage, and by images of artwork depicting Africans and their civilization over the centuries. Actor Wesley Snipes executive produced the film and serves as a narrator. John Henrik Clarke: A Great and Mighty Walk was made in 1996, with Clarke suffering from glaucoma, barely able to see as he gives his sweeping account. He talks about his own upbringing, and his growing interest in Pan-Africanism, the failures of the civil rights movement and the Black Power movement, his close friendship with Malcolm X, and his critical assessment of Louis Farrakhan’s Million Man March. He also gives a primer on the history of African civilization, and argues that no conquering or colonizing power ever “brought civilization” to Africa, but rather these nations destroyed what civilization they didn’t understand, and brought many of Africa’s ideas back to their bases in ancient Greece and Rome. He also describes how Black Africans were methodically removed from the history of the civilization of the Nile. He details how leaders like Marcus Garvey, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Ghanaian Kwame Nkrumah spread the ideas of Pan-Africanism throughout the U.S. and the world. John Henrik Clarke: A Great and Mighty Walk was shown at the 1997 Sundance Film Festival, and won the Best Documentary award at the 1997 UrbanWorld Film Festival. Clarke died of a heart attack in 1998. ~ Josh Ralske, Rovi

sancophaleague:

Earlier this year Zora Ball was your average 1st grader until she decided to create and develop a mobile video game app, making her the youngest person to ever do so. At just 7-years old Zora managed to learn a programming language called “Bootstrap” that is normally used to teach kids ages 12 through 16 the different concepts of Algebra by using video games. Her teachers and family were astonished by her accomplishment. 

She was invited to an expo at the University of Penn where she was put on the spot and asked to reconfigure the app in front of everyone to prove that it was her that developed the mobile app in the first place and not her older brother who is a scholar student. Zora successfully did so and got rid of any doubt that anyone had. 
Zora Ball is now referred to a young prodigy with an extremely bright future in technology and computer science. Young Zora is an example of Black Excellence not having an age requirement.
Written By: @Champion_Us

Glaciers of Ice

"Proceed with caution as you enter the symphony
Degrees of pulse will increase intensely
Syndrome was caused by the deadly drums
But the battle was won by swords being swung
Slicing with a vocal
From the international vocalist
Ya style is too local
To fuck with this
All fits of antagonists
No assistance movin motionless
Mysterious swiftness
Thoughts roll down the shaft of the brain
Mental gives the signal to the physical
Whirlwind kicks and hits from every angle
Violent temperments
Uncountenance dented
Poison vintage wine rhymes I invented
Chumped by the drunken punches that punches the heart
Vital sparks from the arteries start” ………….. Master Killah reeks havoc on this one. God!!! I love this song. Perfection to the max.

We’re fifteen minutes into a conversation
About patriarchy
And the messages in the media
And the way young girls are taught to rather starve
than be fat
And the way young women walk on egg shells
when the walk in question
Is after 9 pm
On a Tuesday
To her mothers house

We talk about how it feels to be female
How It feels to be violated
Objectified
Devalued
Tossed aside
We talk about female infanticide
And we talk about the wage gap
And the way men sit on the bus
And we talk about issues
mostly relevant
To us

But then I say “and as white feminists”
And her flag goes up
Because she’d rather talk about the persecution of her bust
Than the way that
Wage gap aside
She still makes more
than black guys

Because rape culture doesn’t mean shit to her
When it’s acknowledging that
Women of Color
Get the short end of
the already shitty stick
and when it’s asserted that a black woman
saying she was raped
is treated with the same dignity
as that one kid who cried wolf
she claims exclusion
but she says she’s not racist
even though
no body said she was

The mere idea of a feminism
That doesn’t involve
Women who
Look like her
Exist like her
Suffer like her
Is too scary a thought

And suddenly
For a brief second in a haze of
Racist
Exclusionary
Whitewashed bullshit
She knows what it feels like to be
A feminist
and
a black woman

Another poem I wrote for a zine I’m working on, this one is calling: Margaret Sanger isn’t For Everybody  (via fat-feminist)
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